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Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health

Courses by Areas of Interest

The department’s five areas of interest are adolescent health; child health; maternal, fetal and perinatal health; population and health; and women, sexual and reproductive health.

Our dedicated interdisciplinary faculty develop and apply a broad range of methods to research and professional practice. These methods include: demography and related social sciences, epidemiology, qualitative research, health services research and program evaluation. Faculty are drawn from multiple disciplines including demography, epidemiology, public health, sociology, nutrition, economics, policy analysis, health services research, family planning administration, developmental psychology, medicine and nursing.

    Below you can find the courses for each area of interest:

    Adolescent Health
    • 221.627 – Issues in the Reduction of Maternal and Neonatal Mortality in Low Income Countries (A. Creanga, M. Munos)
      Designed so that students understand the clinical and social causes of high maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity. Exposes students to the clinical, program and policy interventions that address these issues, and evaluates the strength of the evidence supporting these interventions. Offers practical exercises for students to: 1.) understand the scope and epidemiology of both maternal and neonatal problems, and 2.) design and assess programmatic responses to address them. Upon completion, students will have the knowledge base to be able to contribute to program and policy responses with an informed perspective to avert maternal and newborn deaths in different contexts.
    • 380.600 – Principals of Population Change (S. Bell)
      Provides students with a basic understanding of the field of demography—the study of human populations and how they change by birth, death, and migration. Examines how and why birth and death rates change, and how governments and other groups attempt to take into account the effects of birth rates, death rates, and migration on public health, the economy, the environment, and other aspects of human well-being.
    • 380.603.01 / 380.603.81 – Demographic Methods for Public Health (ME Hughes)
      Teaches students the basic methods demographers use to describe populations and analyze population change. Introduces the concept of a population, describes the demographic approach to populations, and identifies sources of population data. Covers four sets of methods with broad applicability in public health: 1) techniques for describing population composition, distribution, and growth; 2) methods to compare populations (age-period-cohort approaches and standardization and decomposition of rates); 3) single-decrement life tables; and 4) the cohort-component method for population projection. Also covers the basic tools used to study the fundamental population processes of fertility, mortality, and migration.
    • 380.604.01 / 380.604.81 – Life Course Perspectives on Health (ME Hughes, C. Minkovitz)
      Teaches students to frame public health issues using a multilevel, life course perspective. Provides a conceptual framework with which to understand the development of health over time and the interrelated effects of biological, psychological, and social factors on health. Elaborates and illustrates the framework by considering health in specific life stages, highlighting multilevel, life course influences on health, processes by which social influences “get under the skin”, and multilevel, life course approaches to research and practice. Students create a conceptual framework illustrating the application of the framework to a public health outcome their choice.
    • 380.623.81 Adolescent Health and Development (R. Blum)
      Lectures on research findings and issues present biological, psychological, and social aspects of normal adolescent growth and development as a framework for viewing a variety of adolescent health problems and their social and biological effects. Also considers programmatic needs of the adolescent.
    • 380.624.01 - 380.624.81 – Maternal and Child Health Legislation and Programs (C. Minkovitz, S. Riese)
      Analyzes the structure, organization, administration and management of social and health service programs serving the maternal and child health populations. Lectures, discussions, and analysis of current research and practice present the goals and impact of national programs such as Title V MCH/CSHCN, Medicaid/CHIP, Head Start, Family Planning, WIC/Nutrition, community/migrant health centers, child welfare, and of privately sponsored programs.
    • 380.625.01 – Evidence and Opportunities to Mitigate Childhood Adversity and Promote Well-Being (C. Bethell)
      Examines conceptual and epidemiological issues related to chronic illnesses and disabling conditions of childhood, including social and personal attitudes; epidemiology of serious health conditions; chronic illness or disability in the context of child and family development; implementing and evaluating community based programs; and the structure, function, administration, and management of major US governmental programs that serve children with disabilities and chronic illnesses.
    • 380.640.01 – Children in Crisis: An Asset-Based Approach to Working With Vulnerable Youth (B. Marshall, T. Powell)
      Uses experienced practitioners, community leaders, and community members to expose students to a wide range of domestic youth welfare issues and interventions through an asset lens. Using an asset-based approach, the class highlights domestic youth challenges (e.g., disconnection, homelessness, LGBTQ status and justice involvement) and aims to expose students to thoughts, voices, and perspectives from a variety of different backgrounds. Class sessions feature ample discussion, expert lecturers, youth voices, and an examination of existing programs in and out of Baltimore City.
    • 380.661.01 – Clinical Aspects of Maternal and Neonatal Health (P. Donohue, D. Strobino)
      Presents morbidity and mortality in the mother, fetus, and newborn and the health care practices utilized to prevent, diagnose, and treat this morbidity. Guest speakers in clinical care present lectures from the clinical perspective; course instructors present the public health perspective.
    • 380.665.01 – Family Planning Policies and Programs (S. Radloff, L. Zimmerman)
      Introduces issues and programmatic strategies related to the development, organization, and management of family planning programs, especially those in developing countries. Topics include social, economic, health, and human rights rationale for family planning; identifying and measuring populations in need of family planning services; social, cultural, political, and ethical barriers; contraceptive methods and their programmatic requirements; strategic alternatives, including integrated and vertical programs and public and private sector services; information, education, and communication strategies; management information systems; and the use of computer models for program design.
    • 380.720.01 – Masculinity, Sexual Behavior and Health: Adolescence and Beyond (A. Marcell)
      Focuses on male health with particular attention to sexual and reproductive health and healthcare use among adolescents, extending throughout the lifespan. Assesses the principal health concerns for sexual and reproductive health, the associated population-based risk factors, and the relative impact of each risk factor. Students critically examine the meaning of masculinity and the impact of masculinity beliefs on males’ health and healthcare use. Students also evaluate strategies to promote population health including the policies and programs or health care delivery that address health concerns and behavior for male sexual and reproductive health.
    • 380.721.01 – Schools and Health (B. Marshall)
      Highlights schools as public health contexts in three ways: shaping development and behavioral outcomes of youth, delivery of health information and services, and research. Explores the school context using the ten-component Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) framework developed by the Centers for Disease Control and the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Requires students to visit a school and explore the practical program implementation challenges related to provision and promotion of health in a school setting. Examines the research on the impact school health programs have on the health and wellbeing of school-age children using WSCC framework. Explores conducting research in schools and how that impacts knowledge of what works in school contexts through combination of introductory lectures, discussion, presentations, and a school site visit.
    • 380.725.01 – Social Context of Adolescent Health (T. Williams Powell)
      Recognizes the social ecological model, social determinants of health framework and the life course perspective as tools to understand adolescent health. Explores the influences of contexts, such as the families and neighborhoods, on adolescent health and well-being. Examines empirical work to consider the role of context in prevention and interventions aimed at adolescents. Integrates service-learning opportunities with traditional learning pedagogies to address adolescent health.
    • 380.747.81 – International Adolescent Health (K. Mmari and R. Blum)
      Focuses on the major health issues that affect adolescents and the effective interventions/policies to address these issues in the developing world. Explores the meaning and health of adolescence from various contexts around the world through lectures, readings, video clips, panels, and discussions.
    • 380.749.01 – Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health (A. Burke, M. Trent)
      Explores key topics in adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH). Topics range from the impact of adolescent physical, sexual, and social development on sexual risk-taking behavior to policy and ethical issues influencing adolescent sexual health outcomes. Using a public health framework, important clinical topics such as contraception, teen pregnancy, abortion, and sexually transmitted infections are discussed from a domestic and global perspective.
    • 380.760.01 – Clinical Aspects of Reproductive Health (A. Burke)
      Provides a comprehensive presentation of several clinical disease processes affecting women’s reproductive health. Topics include contraception, cervical cancer screening, STI, menopause and incontinence. Uses traditional lecture materials, selected readings, and in-class discussion. Focuses not only on the clinical aspect of the disease, but the health policy implications on women’s health.
    • 380.761.01/380.761.81 – Sexually Transmitted Infections in Public Health Practice (J. Jennings, A. Rompalo)
      Provides a comprehensive and current synthesis of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the United States and globally. Examines biologic, behavioral, social, and epidemiologic aspects of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Focuses, throughout the course, on the diverse factors that contribute to STI prevention and control. Discusses how biologic and behavioral factors influence preventability and control of STIs. Introduces a number of STI prevention and control interventions with an emphasis on evaluation of these interventions. Data-focused and driven by current research study findings and surveillance data. Particularly focuses on considering strengths and weakness of various data sources and study designs and on thinking critically about what’s going on ‘behind the numbers.
    • 380.762.81 – HIV Infection in Women, Children and Adolescents (H. Brahmbhatt)
      Presents the epidemiology of AIDS and HIV infection, risk factors, and social context for women, children, and adolescents, demonstrating how the epidemic in these three populations are linked biologically, epidemically, socially, and politically. Discusses prevention issues, the theoretical bases of prevention programs, and programatic and policy issues. Emphasizes the epidemiological and behavioral factors that have shaped the current epidemic of HIV infection. Expert guest speakers present their work.
    • 380.771.01 – Understanding International Reproductive Health Policy (D. Gillespie, B. Fredrick)
      Introduces students to policy analysis and issues in reproductive health, especially international family planning. Students learn how to analyze policymaking processes and ways to influence these processes through evidence-based advocacy. Case studies are used to analyze policies. Focues on FP2020, the international partnership launched at the London Summit on Family Planning in 2012. The instructors present an “insider’s” perspective for most cases and will draw heavily on Advance Family Planning (AFP), a multi-country advocacy initiative. Training in the AFP SMART approach to advocacy is a core part of the course.
    Child Health
    • 221.627 – Issues in the Reduction of Maternal and Neonatal Mortality in Low Income Countries (A. Creanga, M. Munos)
      Designed so that students understand the clinical and social causes of high maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity. Exposes students to the clinical, program and policy interventions that address these issues, and evaluates the strength of the evidence supporting these interventions. Offers practical exercises for students to: 1.) understand the scope and epidemiology of both maternal and neonatal problems, and 2.) design and assess programmatic responses to address them. Upon completion, students will have the knowledge base to be able to contribute to program and policy responses with an informed perspective to avert maternal and newborn deaths in different contexts.
    • 223.663 – Infectious Diseases and Child Survival (A. Ruff, K. Talaat)
      Reviews the major causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in the developed and developing world, and introduces intervention strategies. Reviews infectious disease problems contributing to childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide, including (but not limited to) HIV, TB, hepatitis, diarrheal disease, ARI, helminth infections, and measles. Emphasizes epidemiology, strategies for prevention and control, and differences between developed and developing countries.
    • 330.640 – Childhood Victimization: a Public Health Perspective (E. Letourneau)
      Examines childhood victimization across a wide spectrum of victimizations, including sexual and physical abuse, peer and sibling assaults, witnessing domestic violence and verbal abuse and neglect. Acquaints students with the epidemiology of childhood victimization, reviews existing victim and perpetrator-focused interventions, and explores established emerging prevention strategies. Reviews legal policies aimed at reducing childhood victimization, their strengths and weaknesses, and challenges to the notion that childhood victimization is, or can be, effectively addressed solely or primarily via criminal justice interventions.
    • 380.600 – Principals of Population Change (S. Bell)
      Provides students with a basic understanding of the field of demography—the study of human populations and how they change by birth, death, and migration. Examines how and why birth and death rates change, and how governments and other groups attempt to take into account the effects of birth rates, death rates, and migration on public health, the economy, the environment, and other aspects of human well-being.
    • 380.603.01 / 380.603.81 – Demographic Methods for Public Health (ME Hughes)
      Teaches students the basic methods demographers use to describe populations and analyze population change. Introduces the concept of a population, describes the demographic approach to populations, and identifies sources of population data. Covers four sets of methods with broad applicability in public health: 1) techniques for describing population composition, distribution, and growth; 2) methods to compare populations (age-period-cohort approaches and standardization and decomposition of rates); 3) single-decrement life tables; and 4) the cohort-component method for population projection. Also covers the basic tools used to study the fundamental population processes of fertility, mortality, and migration.
    • 380.604.01 / 380.604.81 – Life Course Perspectives on Health (ME Hughes, C. Minkovitz)
      Teaches students to frame public health issues using a multilevel, life course perspective. Provides a conceptual framework with which to understand the development of health over time and the interrelated effects of biological, psychological, and social factors on health. Elaborates and illustrates the framework by considering health in specific life stages, highlighting multilevel, life course influences on health, processes by which social influences “get under the skin”, and multilevel, life course approaches to research and practice. Students create a conceptual framework illustrating the application of the framework to a public health outcome their choice.
    • 380.616.01 – Child Health Epidemiology (P. Donohue)
      Explores conditions and diseases that compromise children’s health from birth (congenital anomalies) through adolescence (violence/bullying). Presents methodological challenges to estimating the burden of disease, including the strengths and weaknesses of standardized outcome measures. Analyzes preventive strategies and treatment modalities considering the social context of disease. Encourages creative thinking about needed research and discusses the public health implication of childhood disease. Focuses on domestic health but presents data on the global burden of childhood conditions/diseases, when available.
    • 380.623.81 Adolescent Health and Development (R. Blum)
      Lectures on research findings and issues present biological, psychological, and social aspects of normal adolescent growth and development as a framework for viewing a variety of adolescent health problems and their social and biological effects. Also considers programmatic needs of the adolescent.
    • 380.624.01 - 380.624.81 – Maternal and Child Health Legislation and Programs (C. Minkovitz, S. Riese)
      Analyzes the structure, organization, administration and management of social and health service programs serving the maternal and child health populations. Lectures, discussions, and analysis of current research and practice present the goals and impact of national programs such as Title V MCH/CSHCN, Medicaid/CHIP, Head Start, Family Planning, WIC/Nutrition, community/migrant health centers, child welfare, and of privately sponsored programs.
    • 380.625.01 – Evidence and Opportunities to Mitigate Childhood Adversity and Promote Well-Being (C. Bethell)
      Examines conceptual and epidemiological issues related to chronic illnesses and disabling conditions of childhood, including social and personal attitudes; epidemiology of serious health conditions; chronic illness or disability in the context of child and family development; implementing and evaluating community based programs; and the structure, function, administration, and management of major US governmental programs that serve children with disabilities and chronic illnesses.
    • 380.640.01 – Children in Crisis: An Asset-Based Approach to Working With Vulnerable Youth (B. Marshall, T. Powell)
      Uses experienced practitioners, community leaders, and community members to expose students to a wide range of domestic youth welfare issues and interventions through an asset lens. Using an asset-based approach, the class highlights domestic youth challenges (e.g., disconnection, homelessness, LGBTQ status and justice involvement) and aims to expose students to thoughts, voices, and perspectives from a variety of different backgrounds. Class sessions feature ample discussion, expert lecturers, youth voices, and an examination of existing programs in and out of Baltimore City.
    • 380.642.81 – Child Health and Development (K. Voegtline)
      Focuses on the core processes of growth and development in early to middle childhood. Considers developmental theories, issues and research findings related to physical growth and cognitive, emotional, and social development. Considers appropriate instruments to assess growth and development. Evaluates efficacy of popular early intervention programs designed to enhance development in at-risk populations of children.
    • 380.661.01 – Clinical Aspects of Maternal and Neonatal Health (P. Donohue, D. Strobino)
      Presents morbidity and mortality in the mother, fetus, and newborn and the health care practices utilized to prevent, diagnose, and treat this morbidity. Guest speakers in clinical care present lectures from the clinical perspective; course instructors present the public health perspective.
    • 380.721.01 – Schools and Health (B. Marshall)
      Highlights schools as public health contexts in three ways: shaping development and behavioral outcomes of youth, delivery of health information and services, and research. Explores the school context using the ten-component Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) framework developed by the Centers for Disease Control and the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Requires students to visit a school and explore the practical program implementation challenges related to provision and promotion of health in a school setting. Examines the research on the impact school health programs have on the health and wellbeing of school-age children using WSCC framework. Explores conducting research in schools and how that impacts knowledge of what works in school contexts through combination of introductory lectures, discussion, presentations, and a school site visit.
    • 380.740.81 – Nutrition Programs, Policies, Politics in the United States: The Impact on Maternal, Child and Family Health (D. Paige, S. Gross)
      Addresses nutrition programs, policies, and politics in the US, and their impact on economically disadvantaged mothers, children, and families. Defines and explores food insecurity. Examines nutrition programs directed at high-risk populations. Reviews the administrative and political considerations of nutrition programs and discusses the nutritional impact on health, growth and development. Discusses corporate and commercial interests, their role in shaping the political discussion and their impact on food and nutrition policy.
    • 380.742.01 – Family Health, Public Health and Policy (A. Riley)
      Focuses on understanding how programs and policies are likely to affect the capacities of families to develop and maintain health, and on teaching students to apply analytic methods to evaluate the relative value and impact of various programs or policies.
    • 380.744.81 – Nutrition and Growth in Maternal and Child Health (D. Paige, S. Gross)
      Examines the impact of nutritional status on growth, development, intellectual performance, health status, and the onset and progress of chronic diseases. Considers ethnic, cultural, and environmental issues related to food intake as well as the relationship between physical activity and health. Examines the origin and basis for the identification and assessment of community need using the national nutrition monitoring system. Reviews federally funded nutrition program outcomes and their policy implication.
    • 380.762.81 – HIV Infection in Women, Children & Adolescents (H. Brahmbhatt)
      Presents the epidemiology of AIDS and HIV infection, risk factors, and social context for women, children, and adolescents, demonstrating how the epidemic in these three populations are linked biologically, epidemically, socially, and politically. Discusses prevention issues, the theoretical bases of prevention programs, and programatic and policy issues. Emphasizes the epidemiological and behavioral factors that have shaped the current epidemic of HIV infection. Expert guest speakers present their work.
    • 380.765.81 – Preventing Infant Mortality and Promoting the Health of Women, Infants, and Children (M. Matone)
      Focuses on the historical problems and interventions associated with infant mortality. Describes the scientific basis for maternal and infant mortality. Analyzes causes and consequences in a population and development of a programmatic and policy approach.
    • 410.752.01 – Children, Media and Health (L. Lagasse)
      Reviews children’s media use, with a particular focus on television, print, and digital media. Describes the role of media in shaping a variety of health-related behaviors and outcomes relevant to childhood and adolescence. Acquaints students with variety of social and behavioral perspectives on child development. Examines how media content frame critical issues related to child and adolescent health. Introduces policy and advocacy initiatives addressing the form and content of children’s media.
    Maternal, Fetal and Perinatal Health Courses
    • 120.620.01/120.620.81 – Fundamentals of Reproductive Biology (H. DiFrancesca, B. Zirkin, P. Jordan, W. Wright)
      Addresses the basic biological mechanisms that underlie male and female reproduction and that pertain to reproductive health issues, such as contraception, infertility, sexually transmitted diseases, and reproductive aging.
    • 221.627.01 – Issues in the Reduction of Maternal and Neonatal Mortality in Low Income Countries (A. Creanga, M. Munos)
      Designed so that students understand the clinical and social causes of high maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity. Exposes students to the clinical, program and policy interventions that address these issues, and evaluates the strength of the evidence supporting these interventions. Offers practical exercises for students to: 1.) understand the scope and epidemiology of both maternal and neonatal problems, and 2.) design and assess programmatic responses to address them. Upon completion, students will have the knowledge base to be able to contribute to program and policy responses with an informed perspective to avert maternal and newborn deaths in different contexts.
    • 380.600.01 – Principals of Population Change (S. Bell)
      Provides students with a basic understanding of the field of demography—the study of human populations and how they change by birth, death, and migration. Examines how and why birth and death rates change, and how governments and other groups attempt to take into account the effects of birth rates, death rates, and migration on public health, the economy, the environment, and other aspects of human well-being.
    • 380.603.01/380.603.81 – Demographic Methods for Public Health (M.E. Hughes)
      Teaches students the basic methods demographers use to describe populations and analyze population change. Introduces the concept of a population, describes the demographic approach to populations, and identifies sources of population data. Covers four sets of methods with broad applicability in public health: 1) techniques for describing population composition, distribution, and growth; 2) methods to compare populations (age-period-cohort approaches and standardization and decomposition of rates); 3) single-decrement life tables; and 4) the cohort-component method for population projection. Also covers the basic tools used to study the fundamental population processes of fertility, mortality, and migration.
    • 380.604.01/380.604.81 – Life Course Perspectives on Health (M.E. Hughes, C. Minkovitz)
      Teaches students to frame public health issues using a multilevel, life course perspective. Provides a conceptual framework with which to understand the development of health over time and the interrelated effects of biological, psychological, and social factors on health. Elaborates and illustrates the framework by considering health in specific life stages, highlighting multilevel, life course influences on health, processes by which social influences “get under the skin”, and multilevel, life course approaches to research and practice. Students create a conceptual framework illustrating the application of the framework to a public health outcome their choice.
    • 380.624.01/380.624.81 – Maternal and Child Health Legislation and Programs (C. Minkovitz, S. Riese)
      Analyzes the structure, organization, administration and management of social and health service programs serving the maternal and child health populations. Lectures, discussions, and analysis of current research and practice present the goals and impact of national programs such as Title V MCH/CSHCN, Medicaid/CHIP, Head Start, Family Planning, WIC/Nutrition, community/migrant health centers, child welfare, and of privately sponsored programs.
    • 380.655.01 – Social and Economic Aspects of Human Fertility (L. Zimmerman, S. Becker)
      The study of fertility is an integral part of population studies (along with mortality and migration) and gives essential background for those studying women’s, infant and perinatal health. This course will cover social and economic theories of fertility, will explore fertility transitions in India, China, the USA and Sub Saharan Africa, will examine major distal and intermediate determinants of fertility and will consider policies affecting fertility around the world. The course will be based on readings that are discussed by student and faculty participants.
    • 380.661.01 – Clinical Aspects of Maternal and Newborn Health (P. Donohue, D. Strobino)
      Presents morbidity and mortality in the mother, fetus, and newborn and the health care practices utilized to prevent, diagnose, and treat this morbidity. Guest speakers in clinical care present lectures from the clinical perspective; course instructors present the public health perspective.
    • 380.662.01 – Critiquing the Research Literature in Maternal, Neonatal, and Reproductive Health (D. Strobino)
      Discusses the sources of data and analytic and conceptual basis for methodological approaches to the study of maternal, neonatal, and reproductive health. Critically evaluates selected research articles in maternal, neonatal, and reproductive health.
    • 380.664.01 – Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology (C. Moreau)
      Focuses on current research, controversial issues and methodological approaches about the epidemiology of reproductive and perinatal health. Selected topics include, but are not limited to, conception, infertility, contraception, hormone supplementation, reproductive related cancers, complications of pregnancy, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Includes short lectures on selected topics, followed by student-directed discussion of research readings and their public health implications.
    • 380.665.01– Family Planning Policies and Programs (S. Radloff, L. Zimmerman)
      Introduces issues and programmatic strategies related to the development, organization, and management of family planning programs, especially those in developing countries. Topics include social, economic, health, and human rights rationale for family planning; identifying and measuring populations in need of family planning services; social, cultural, political, and ethical barriers; contraceptive methods and their programmatic requirements; strategic alternatives, including integrated and vertical programs and public and private sector services; information, education, and communication strategies; management information systems; and the use of computer models for program design.
    • 380.721.01 – Schools and Health (B. Marshall)
      Highlights schools as public health contexts in three ways: shaping development and behavioral outcomes of youth, delivery of health information and services, and research. Explores the school context using the ten-component Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) framework developed by the Centers for Disease Control and the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Requires students to visit a school and explore the practical program implementation challenges related to provision and promotion of health in a school setting. Examines the research on the impact school health programs have on the health and wellbeing of school-age children using WSCC framework. Explores conducting research in schools and how that impacts knowledge of what works in school contexts through combination of introductory lectures, discussion, presentations, and a school site visit.
    • 380.740.81 – Nutrition Programs, Policies, Politics in the United States: The Impact on Maternal, Child and Family Health (D. Paige, S. Gross)
      Addresses nutrition programs, policies, and politics in the US, and their impact on economically disadvantaged mothers, children, and families. Defines and explores food insecurity. Examines nutrition programs directed at high-risk populations. Reviews the administrative and political considerations of nutrition programs and discusses the nutritional impact on health, growth and development. Discusses corporate and commercial interests, their role in shaping the political discussion and their impact on food and nutrition policy.
    • 380.744.81 – Nutrition and Growth in Maternal and Child Health (D. Paige, S. Gross)
      Examines the impact of nutritional status on growth, development, intellectual performance, health status, and the onset and progress of chronic diseases. Considers ethnic, cultural, and environmental issues related to food intake as well as the relationship between physical activity and health. Examines the origin and basis for the identification and assessment of community need using the national nutrition monitoring system. Reviews federally funded nutrition program outcomes and their policy implication.
    • 380.760.01 – Clinical Aspects of Reproductive Health (A. Burke)
      Provides a comprehensive presentation of several clinical disease processes affecting women’s reproductive health. Topics include contraception, cervical cancer screening, STI, menopause and incontinence. Uses traditional lecture materials, selected readings, and in-class discussion. Focuses not only on the clinical aspect of the disease, but the health policy implications on women’s health.
    • 380.765.81 – Preventing Infant Mortality and Promoting the Health of Women, Infants, and Children (M. Matone)
      Focuses on the historical problems and interventions associated with infant mortality. Describes the scientific basis for maternal and infant mortality. Analyzes causes and consequences in a population and development of a programmatic and policy approach.
    Population and Health
    • 221.627 – Issues in the Reduction of Maternal and Neonatal Mortality in Low Income Countries (A. Creanga, M. Munos)
      Designed so that students understand the clinical and social causes of high maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity. Exposes students to the clinical, program and policy interventions that address these issues, and evaluates the strength of the evidence supporting these interventions. Offers practical exercises for students to: 1.) understand the scope and epidemiology of both maternal and neonatal problems, and 2.) design and assess programmatic responses to address them. Upon completion, students will have the knowledge base to be able to contribute to program and policy responses with an informed perspective to avert maternal and newborn deaths in different contexts.
    • 380.600 – Principals of Population Change (S. Bell)
      Provides students with a basic understanding of the field of demography—the study of human populations and how they change by birth, death, and migration. Examines how and why birth and death rates change, and how governments and other groups attempt to take into account the effects of birth rates, death rates, and migration on public health, the economy, the environment, and other aspects of human well-being.
    • 380.603.01 / 380.603.81 – Demographic Methods for Public Health (ME Hughes)
      Teaches students the basic methods demographers use to describe populations and analyze population change. Introduces the concept of a population, describes the demographic approach to populations, and identifies sources of population data. Covers four sets of methods with broad applicability in public health: 1) techniques for describing population composition, distribution, and growth; 2) methods to compare populations (age-period-cohort approaches and standardization and decomposition of rates); 3) single-decrement life tables; and 4) the cohort-component method for population projection. Also covers the basic tools used to study the fundamental population processes of fertility, mortality, and migration.
    • 380.604.01 / 380.604.81 – Life Course Perspectives on Health (ME Hughes, C. Minkovitz)
      Teaches students to frame public health issues using a multilevel, life course perspective. Provides a conceptual framework with which to understand the development of health over time and the interrelated effects of biological, psychological, and social factors on health. Elaborates and illustrates the framework by considering health in specific life stages, highlighting multilevel, life course influences on health, processes by which social influences “get under the skin”, and multilevel, life course approaches to research and practice. Students create a conceptual framework illustrating the application of the framework to a public health outcome their choice.
    • 380.624.01 / 380.624.81 – Maternal and Child Health Legislation and Programs (C. Minkovitz, S. Riese)
      Analyzes the structure, organization, administration and management of social and health service programs serving the maternal and child health populations. Lectures, discussions, and analysis of current research and practice present the goals and impact of national programs such as Title V MCH/CSHCN, Medicaid/CHIP, Head Start, Family Planning, WIC/Nutrition, community/migrant health centers, child welfare, and of privately sponsored programs.
    • 380.635.01 – Urban Health in Contemporary America (R. Blum)
      Introduces students to the historical forces associated with the rise of the modern city and the fundamental characteristics of urban living in the U.S. Discusses the impact of the increase in urban settings on population health. Examines contexts of the urban environment that shape health including: the physical environment, housing, education, discrimination and racism, policing, and safety. Explores the complexity and diversity of the determinants of health among domestic urban populations.
    • 380.655.01 – Social and Economic Aspects of Human Fertility (L. Zimmerman, S. Becker)
      The study of fertility is an integral part of population studies (along with mortality and migration) and gives essential background for those studying women’s, infant and perinatal health. This course will cover social and economic theories of fertility, will explore fertility transitions in India, China, the USA and Sub Saharan Africa, will examine major distal and intermediate determinants of fertility and will consider policies affecting fertility around the world. The course will be based on readings that are discussed by student and faculty participants.
    • 380.661.01 – Clinical Aspects of Maternal and Newborn Health (P. Donohue, D. Strobino)
      Presents morbidity and mortality in the mother, fetus, and newborn and the health care practices utilized to prevent, diagnose, and treat this morbidity. Guest speakers in clinical care present lectures from the clinical perspective; course instructors present the public health perspective.
    • 380.662.01 – Critiquing the Research Literature in Maternal, Neonatal, and Reproductive Health (D. Strobino)
      Discusses the sources of data and analytic and conceptual basis for methodological approaches to the study of maternal, neonatal, and reproductive health. Critically evaluates selected research articles in maternal, neonatal, and reproductive health.
    • 380.664.01 – Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology (C. Moreau)
      Focuses on current research, controversial issues and methodological approaches about the epidemiology of reproductive and perinatal health. Selected topics include, but are not limited to, conception, infertility, contraception, hormone supplementation, reproductive related cancers, complications of pregnancy, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Includes short lectures on selected topics, followed by student-directed discussion of research readings and their public health implications.
    • 380.665.01 – Family Planning Policies and Programs (S. Radloff, L. Zimmerman)
      Introduces issues and programmatic strategies related to the development, organization, and management of family planning programs, especially those in developing countries. Topics include social, economic, health, and human rights rationale for family planning; identifying and measuring populations in need of family planning services; social, cultural, political, and ethical barriers; contraceptive methods and their programmatic requirements; strategic alternatives, including integrated and vertical programs and public and private sector services; information, education, and communication strategies; management information systems; and the use of computer models for program design.
    • 380.721.01 – Schools and Health (B. Marshall)
      Highlights schools as public health contexts in three ways: shaping development and behavioral outcomes of youth, delivery of health information and services, and research. Explores the school context using the ten-component Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) framework developed by the Centers for Disease Control and the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Requires students to visit a school and explore the practical program implementation challenges related to provision and promotion of health in a school setting. Examines the research on the impact school health programs have on the health and wellbeing of school-age children using WSCC framework. Explores conducting research in schools and how that impacts knowledge of what works in school contexts through combination of introductory lectures, discussion, presentations, and a school site visit.
    • 380.750.01 – Migration and Health: Concepts, Rates, and Relationships (C. Robinson)
      Students review migration and health research to be able to identify key concepts, categories and trends in migration; to describe basic methods (and limitations) in measuring migration, and to analyze the relationships between migration and health, including patterns and rates of demographic change; gender and reproductive health; vulnerable populations (including victims of trafficking); migration policy and human rights.
    • 380.756.01* – Poverty, Economic Development, and Health (D. Bishai)
      Introduces students to leading theories in economic development and in the macroeconomic determinants of the health of populations, communities, and individuals. Reviews both historical and current cases to answer the following questions: What is economic development? How does economic development occur? Which aspects of development improve and which aspects are detrimental to human health? Can policymakers plot more “hygienic” plans for economic development? Do investments in health and family planning cause economies to prosper?
      *Offered every other year
    • 380.760.01 – Clinical Aspects of Reproductive Health (A. Burke)
      Provides a comprehensive presentation of several clinical disease processes affecting women’s reproductive health. Topics include contraception, cervical cancer screening, STI, menopause and incontinence. Uses traditional lecture materials, selected readings, and in-class discussion. Focuses not only on the clinical aspect of the disease, but the health policy implications on women’s health.
    • 380.765.81 – Preventing Infant Mortality and Promoting the Health of Women, Infants, and Children (M. Matone)
      Focuses on the historical problems and interventions associated with infant mortality. Describes the scientific basis for maternal and infant mortality. Analyzes causes and consequences in a population and development of a programmatic and policy approach.
    • 380.767.01 – Couples and Reproductive Health (S. Becker)
      Reviews and discusses readings on couples and reproductive health such as: Definitions of couples and of reproductive health; sociological, anthropological and economic perspectives; fertility decision making; critiques of a couple approach from feminists and from those concerned primarily with less stable sexual partnerships for STD/AIDS prevention, and design of couple studies and service delivery interventions.
    Women's, Sexual and Reproductive Health Courses
    • 120.620.01/120.620.81 – Fundamentals of Reproductive Biology (H. DiFrancesca, B. Zirkin, P. Jordan, W. Wright)
      Addresses the basic biological mechanisms that underlie male and female reproduction and that pertain to reproductive health issues, such as contraception, infertility, sexually transmitted diseases, and reproductive aging.
    • 221.627.01 – Issues in the Reduction of Maternal and Neonatal Mortality in Low Income Countries (A. Creanga, M. Munos)
      Designed so that students understand the clinical and social causes of high maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity. Exposes students to the clinical, program and policy interventions that address these issues, and evaluates the strength of the evidence supporting these interventions. Offers practical exercises for students to: 1.) understand the scope and epidemiology of both maternal and neonatal problems, and 2.) design and assess programmatic responses to address them. Upon completion, students will have the knowledge base to be able to contribute to program and policy responses with an informed perspective to avert maternal and newborn deaths in different contexts.
    • 340.629.01 – The Epidemiology of LGBTq Health (S. Beckham, C. Beyrer)
      Introduces constructs of sexual orientation and gender identity in the context of public health. Explores historical, epidemiological, and social perspectives related to the physical and mental health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) individuals and communities. Orients students to current and historic epidemiological and contextual issues that shape what is known about LGBTQ health, presents an overview of LGBTQ health disparities and interventions, and develops a foundation for critical thinking about LGBTQ health research and intervention potential.
    • 380.600.01 – Principals of Population Change (S. Bell)
      Provides students with a basic understanding of the field of demography—the study of human populations and how they change by birth, death, and migration. Examines how and why birth and death rates change, and how governments and other groups attempt to take into account the effects of birth rates, death rates, and migration on public health, the economy, the environment, and other aspects of human well-being.
    • 380.603.01/380.603.81 – Demographic Methods for Public Health (M.E. Hughes)
      Teaches students the basic methods demographers use to describe populations and analyze population change. Introduces the concept of a population, describes the demographic approach to populations, and identifies sources of population data. Covers four sets of methods with broad applicability in public health: 1) techniques for describing population composition, distribution, and growth; 2) methods to compare populations (age-period-cohort approaches and standardization and decomposition of rates); 3) single-decrement life tables; and 4) the cohort-component method for population projection. Also covers the basic tools used to study the fundamental population processes of fertility, mortality, and migration.
    • 380.604.01/380.604.81 – Life Course Perspectives on Health (M.E. Hughes, C. Minkovitz)
      Teaches students to frame public health issues using a multilevel, life course perspective. Provides a conceptual framework with which to understand the development of health over time and the interrelated effects of biological, psychological, and social factors on health. Elaborates and illustrates the framework by considering health in specific life stages, highlighting multilevel, life course influences on health, processes by which social influences “get under the skin”, and multilevel, life course approaches to research and practice. Students create a conceptual framework illustrating the application of the framework to a public health outcome their choice.
    • 380.623.81 – Adolescent Health and Development (R. Blum)
      Lectures on research findings and issues present biological, psychological, and social aspects of normal adolescent growth and development as a framework for viewing a variety of adolescent health problems and their social and biological effects. Also considers programmatic needs of the adolescent.
    • 380.624.01/380.624.81 – Maternal and Child Health Legislation and Programs (C. Minkovitz, S. Riese)
      Analyzes the structure, organization, administration and management of social and health service programs serving the maternal and child health populations. Lectures, discussions, and analysis of current research and practice present the goals and impact of national programs such as Title V MCH/CSHCN, Medicaid/CHIP, Head Start, Family Planning, WIC/Nutrition, community/migrant health centers, child welfare, and of privately sponsored programs.
    • 380.628.01 – Public Health Perspectives on Abortion
      Provide students with an overview of abortion practice in the United States and worldwide from a public health perspective. Lectures and readings enable students to critically evaluate current research, public health practice, and policy related to abortion, and to speak knowledgably and accurately on these issues.
    • 380.655.01 – Social and Economic Aspects of Human Fertility (L. Zimmerman, S. Becker)
      The study of fertility is an integral part of population studies (along with mortality and migration) and gives essential background for those studying women’s, infant and perinatal health. This course will cover social and economic theories of fertility, will explore fertility transitions in India, China, the USA and Sub Saharan Africa, will examine major distal and intermediate determinants of fertility and will consider policies affecting fertility around the world. The course will be based on readings that are discussed by student and faculty participants.
    • 380.661.01 – Clinical Aspects of Maternal and Newborn Health (P. Donohue, D. Strobino)
      Presents morbidity and mortality in the mother, fetus, and newborn and the health care practices utilized to prevent, diagnose, and treat this morbidity. Guest speakers in clinical care present lectures from the clinical perspective; course instructors present the public health perspective.
    • 380.662.01 – Critiquing the Research Literature in Maternal, Neonatal, and Reproductive Health (D. Strobino)
      Discusses the sources of data and analytic and conceptual basis for methodological approaches to the study of maternal, neonatal, and reproductive health. Critically evaluates selected research articles in maternal, neonatal, and reproductive health.
    • 380.663.01 – Gender-based Violence Research, Practice and Policy (M. Decker)
      Explores gender-based violence (GBV), including intimate partner violence, sexual violence, and sex trafficking. Topics include the following as they relate to GBV: epidemiology, theoretical frameworks, structural risks and gender equity, policy, prevention and intervention, perpetrators, populations with unique needs, and health consequences spanning sexual and reproductive health, STI, and HIV. Prepares students to undertake meaningful scholarly, community-based, programmatic or policy work in the field. Emphasizes active learning and facilitates application of knowledge and skills gained to real world issues.
    • 380.664.01 – Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology (C. Moreau)
      Focuses on current research, controversial issues and methodological approaches about the epidemiology of reproductive and perinatal health. Selected topics include, but are not limited to, conception, infertility, contraception, hormone supplementation, reproductive related cancers, complications of pregnancy, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Includes short lectures on selected topics, followed by student-directed discussion of research readings and their public health implications.
    • 380.665.01– Family Planning Policies and Programs (S. Radloff, L. Zimmerman)
      Introduces issues and programmatic strategies related to the development, organization, and management of family planning programs, especially those in developing countries. Topics include social, economic, health, and human rights rationale for family planning; identifying and measuring populations in need of family planning services; social, cultural, political, and ethical barriers; contraceptive methods and their programmatic requirements; strategic alternatives, including integrated and vertical programs and public and private sector services; information, education, and communication strategies; management information systems; and the use of computer models for program design.
    • 380.666.01 – Women’s Health (M. Decker)
      Presents an overview of the health status of women, and preventive strategies to improve their health, primarily in developed countries. Topics include physical and mental health problems, health behavior, and where appropriate, gender differences in health problems and health behavior. Discusses risk factors for each, as well as effective preventive interventions for women. Views health issues from biological, social, and life course perspectives.
    • 380.667.01 – Women’s Health Policy (C. Holliday)
      Provides an overview of selected, timely policy issues related to women’s health in both developed and developing countries. Covers the history of selected policy concerns, frameworks for viewing these concerns, and specific policies related to women’s health issues such as family planning, gender-based violence, welfare reform, employment and workplace conditions, and disabilities. Topics may change yearly depending on the primacy of the topic or issue.
    • 380.668.01 – International Perspectives on Women, Gender, and Health (L. Heise)
      Examines the ways by which the study of gender informs the study of health in the developing world with a focus on women's health issues. Explores the ways in which gender and sex help us to understand women's health and explain societal patterns of health, disease and well-being. Topics include both reproductive and non-reproductive health issues including mental health and physical health.
    • 380.720.01 – Masculinity, Sexual Behavior and Health: Adolescence and Beyond (A. Marcell)
      Focuses on male health with particular attention to sexual and reproductive health and healthcare use among adolescents, extending throughout the lifespan. Assesses the principal health concerns for sexual and reproductive health, the associated population-based risk factors, and the relative impact of each risk factor. Students critically examine the meaning of masculinity and the impact of masculinity beliefs on males’ health and healthcare use. Students also evaluate strategies to promote population health including the policies and programs or health care delivery that address health concerns and behavior for male sexual and reproductive health.
    • 380.721.01 – Schools and Health (B. Marshall)
      Highlights schools as public health contexts in three ways: shaping development and behavioral outcomes of youth, delivery of health information and services, and research. Explores the school context using the ten-component Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) framework developed by the Centers for Disease Control and the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Requires students to visit a school and explore the practical program implementation challenges related to provision and promotion of health in a school setting. Examines the research on the impact school health programs have on the health and wellbeing of school-age children using WSCC framework. Explores conducting research in schools and how that impacts knowledge of what works in school contexts through combination of introductory lectures, discussion, presentations, and a school site visit.
    • 380.749.01 – Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health (A. Burke, M. Trent)
      Explores key topics in adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH). Topics range from the impact of adolescent physical, sexual, and social development on sexual risk-taking behavior to policy and ethical issues influencing adolescent sexual health outcomes. Using a public health framework, important clinical topics such as contraception, teen pregnancy, abortion, and sexually transmitted infections are discussed from a domestic and global perspective.
    • 380.760.01 – Clinical Aspects of Reproductive Health (A. Burke)
      Provides a comprehensive presentation of several clinical disease processes affecting women’s reproductive health. Topics include contraception, cervical cancer screening, STI, menopause and incontinence. Uses traditional lecture materials, selected readings, and in-class discussion. Focuses not only on the clinical aspect of the disease, but the health policy implications on women’s health.
    • 380.761.01/380.761.81 – Sexually Transmitted Infections in Public Health Practice (J. Jennings, A. Rompalo)
      Provides a comprehensive and current synthesis of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the United States and globally. Examines biologic, behavioral, social, and epidemiologic aspects of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Focuses, throughout the course, on the diverse factors that contribute to STI prevention and control. Discusses how biologic and behavioral factors influence preventability and control of STIs. Introduces a number of STI prevention and control interventions with an emphasis on evaluation of these interventions. Data-focused and driven by current research study findings and surveillance data. Particularly focuses on considering strengths and weakness of various data sources and study designs and on thinking critically about what’s going on ‘behind the numbers.
    • 380.762.81 – HIV Infection in Women, Children and Adolescents (H. Brahmbhatt)
      Presents the epidemiology of AIDS and HIV infection, risk factors, and social context for women, children, and adolescents, demonstrating how the epidemic in these three populations are linked biologically, epidemically, socially, and politically. Discusses prevention issues, the theoretical bases of prevention programs, and programatic and policy issues. Emphasizes the epidemiological and behavioral factors that have shaped the current epidemic of HIV infection. Expert guest speakers present their work.
    • 380.767.01 – Couples and Reproductive Health (S. Becker)
      Reviews and discusses readings on couples and reproductive health such as: Definitions of couples and of reproductive health; sociological, anthropological and economic perspectives; fertility decision making; critiques of a couple approach from feminists and from those concerned primarily with less stable sexual partnerships for STD/AIDS prevention, and design of couple studies and service delivery interventions.
    • 380.768.81 – Selected Topics in Women’s Health and Women’s Health Policy (E. Pearson)
      Discusses major health concerns among women within a life course framework that integrates biological determinants of health and the social, cultural and economic contexts of women’s lives. Focuses on developed countries though issues in developing countries are introduced. Examines a spectrum of current health and policy concerns, and may include family planning, preventive services for women, chronic disease, migration, gender-based violence, mental health and disability. Also includes historical perspectives and a gender justice framework for viewing health policies.
    • 380.771.01 – Understanding International Reproductive Health Policy (D. Gillespie, B. Fredrick)
      Introduces students to policy analysis and issues in reproductive health, especially international family planning. Students learn how to analyze policymaking processes and ways to influence these processes through evidence-based advocacy. Case studies are used to analyze policies. Focues on FP2020, the international partnership launched at the London Summit on Family Planning in 2012. The instructors present an “insider’s” perspective for most cases and will draw heavily on Advance Family Planning (AFP), a multi-country advocacy initiative. Training in the AFP SMART approach to advocacy is a core part of the course.
    • 410.657.01 – Communication Strategies for Sexual Risk Reduction (S. Babalola)
      Strengthens students’ understanding of adolescent sexual risk-taking. Provides a solid foundation in behavior change strategies for sexual risk-reduction from an international perspective. The literature and examples emphasize HIV, STI and teen pregnancy risk reduction. Students work in groups to analyze data analysis and/or review literature. Each group develops a behavior change strategy based on evidence and with a focus on communication. Students select a country and a health topic by the second week of class.