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Department of Biostatistics

Programs

Founded in 1918, Johns Hopkins Biostatistics is the oldest department of its kind in the world, and has consistently ranked among the best.

The department is dedicated to:

  • advancing statistical and data science
  • making discoveries to improve health by partnering with our colleagues in other science domains
  • providing an innovative and outstanding biostatistics education for those seeking to be conversant with concepts as well as for users and experts in the application and development of new methodology.

The Department of Biostatistics offers the following three graduate programs to applicants with a bachelor's degree (or higher) interested in professional or academic careers at the interface of the statistical and health sciences:

Degree Programs

Master's

Master of Health Sciences (MHS)

For outstanding individuals with prior professional experience or a professional degree seeking a one-year intensive course of study in biostatistical theory and methods.

Master of Science (ScM)

For individuals with demonstrated excellence at the undergraduate level in the quantitative or biological sciences who seek a career as a professional statistician.

Doctoral Programs

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

For individuals with demonstrated excellence at the undergraduate level in the quantitative or biological sciences who wish to prepare themselves to become leading biostatistical researchers in academia, industry, or government.

Training Grants

The Department offers a training program sponsored by the National Institute on Aging. It allow participants to work with researchers on developing and applying biostatistical science to two of the most pressing issues of our time: aging and environmental policy.

Epidemiology and Biostatistics of Aging

This grant focuses on the causes of adverse health outcomes in older populations, and successful preventive approaches.